3 Lessons from the 2016 US-election

Lesson #1 – the conspiracy test

The population is divided about opinions on Trump, and whilst his negative trades are so obvious that they don’t have to be mentioned here, there is one very interesting aspect which may shed light on who pulls the strings in world-politics:

With Obama there was the hope of a highly intelligent and silver-tongued person changing the world, but in the end nothing really changed: Guantanamo is not closed yet, a few more nuclear power-stations (which will radiate for 20.000 years) were built in the name of clean energy, healthcare was so expensive that it had destructive impacts on poor workers… Even he himself was supposed to have said that he first believed himself to be a bus driver but soon realised that he was a train-driver who only could move on prebuilt rails.

Now with a mere opposite: A Republican who acts impulsively we see the old-boys structure tested from another angle: If after 4 years some of the puppet-masters are destroyed it is a sign and hope that the elitist background conspiracies are wrong and that there is a way for political motivated people to change things.

But if after Trump’s term all is the same again, then we can be pretty certain that groups like

and that our perceived power to participate in democracy is merely an eyewash.


Lesson #2 – the electoral college

Meanwhile, instead of getting emotionally involved in a finished election, it would be in my eyes more constructive to work on the future and try to change the voting system so that history doesn’t repeat itself again as it did about 5-6 times already when the winner of the popular vote lost the election:

Whilst all Candidates were members of the Democratic-Republican party,
this election inspired the creation of the Democratic Party, leading to the problem of the two-party-system

The next 4 elections were won by the Republican Party

And then there was also

To be entangled in current fights is pretty futile, but to step back and analyse the faults in the US-electoreal-college could lead to a petition for changing this unjust system for good.

There are currently 2 major flaws in the US-electorial system:

  1. The United States is the only country that elects a politically powerful president via an electoral college and the only one in which a candidate can become president without having obtained the highest number of votes in the sole or final round of popular voting. — George C. Edwards, 2011
  2. The Two-Party-System which forces people into a simplified and two-dimansional – “good -bad” thinking, preventing any multifaceted analysis of background contexts.

Lesson #3 – the two-party-system

Why is the second issue of the two-party-system an even worse flaw (by design) ?
Because it squeezes the intelligence of voters into a box so flat into a two-dimensional system, that they have no chance to rise above and have an overview.
This means that voters fight amongst themselves instead of criticising the scheming of the money-masters who pull the strings of both parties.

This strategy was employed since the Roman empire when it was called “Divide et impera : divide and rule“. The same is often applied in prisons where prisoners are instigated to fight amonghts themselves (in order to leave the guards alone).

Third party candidates are often not voted for, because even the most intelligent voters fear that the worst (of the two usually equally corrupt) major candidates could win – so they let themselves get sucked into this simplified axis of thinking in dualism.
The reason why this is futile is because it is not the elections which determine the outcome, but the pre-elections, which are controlled by the elitists which profit from Neoliberalism as well as Neoconservatism. It was a foregone conclusion that Bernie Sanders never had a chance against ehe neoliberal-puppet Clinton, so whilst it was important to support him in the primary elections, independent thinking voters should not have attached themselves emotionally to their antipathy for Trump, but rather should have count their losses, moved on, and in the final elections have voted for Jill Stein.

Take away: If at any point in history a third US-party will gain just 5% the game will start to change, because:

  • 5 percent is the milestone set by the Federal Election Commission to be eligible for the Presidential Election Campaign Fund’s grant.
  • The mainstream-media will start to cover
  • So finally open-minded voters who are fed up with the US-mickey-mouse-election which appeals to the lowest denominator of the fluoride poisoned dumbest assumable voter (dav) will collect their dissatisfaction rather than not to vote at all.

Ron Paul understood this, and Ralph Nader was halfway there already.
Let’s see who is the first to break this electoral sonic wall.

Published by

sitting bull

Currently involved in a longterm meditation-yoga experiment/project to see how far one can evolve, when applying the highest possible methods.

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